Why ask, ‘What if?’

Thirty-five years ago — April 1980 — Peter, who hadn’t yet to been persuaded to marry me, participated in a bike race in Norfolk, Virginia. It was raining lightly and roads were slick. He slid out on a curve and crashed, hitting his head. Not many riders wore helmets back then, though nearly all wore rigid leather “skid lids” that offered little protection except to the scalp. A doctor on the scene diagnosed a concussion, but after resting a bit, Peter drove the three hours home.

I was at a social do elsewhere, one that I’d begged Peter to attend with me. He’d refused. I was upset that his devotion to biking took precedence over his devotion to me.

Forward to about seven years ago and Peter’s initial diagnosis by a neurologist. She said his increasing symptoms “could be” early Alzheimer’s, while an in depth study in 2011 at the Psychological Services and Adult Assessment Center suggested Vascular Dementia, likely caused by the concussion in 1980.

What if I’d insisted he go with me on that April day? What if I’d been at the race with him and had insisted he stay in the hospital overnight? But what if Peter’s dementia is genetic? His grandfather had some form of dementia, and his father had Parkinson’s disease and dementia in his later years.

No matter what the diagnosis, the symptoms and the outcome are the same. There is still no definitive way to diagnose Alzheimer’s until post-mortem. And there is still no cure.

images-1So, my husband who once rode several thousand miles a year for fun, can no longer ride at all because 1.) his balance is shot, and 2.) he’s afraid he’d get lost if he were try a ride. His two custom bikes still live in our basement, and the “clunker” he used to ride around town gathers dust in the shed. I’ve suggested we ride together on our local trail, but he won’t. Although I wasn’t a bad cyclist myself, I was never in his class and he didn’t like to “watch the grass grow” when he rode with me. I’d looked forward to our golden years when he might not mind going at my pace. Not gonna happen.

A friend called recently to catch up. “How’s Peter doing?” he asked. I gave him the short story, then he wanted to know if Peter still biked. When I said no and told him why, he interrupted. “What about a tandem?”

I roared. The thought of Peter allowing me to ride in front while he rode stoker was, well, the laugh I look for every day.

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5 thoughts on “Why ask, ‘What if?’

  1. What if you hadn’t worn your blue fuzzy sweater…what if he hadn’t shown up with fig newtons and KFC…can’t imagine our family without him….no matter how silly or forgetful!!

    Like

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